n-grand

A Grand Short Spin

Lately I haven’t been keeping up on the blog posts. Mainly it’s because I had been busy with getting ready for the opening of my drawing exhibition. Then after that I just felt a bit burnt out and unmotivated. It’s time to get caught up.

This ride was about a week before my show opening. My guess it was June 7th. I was going to attend a lecture over at KDHX about community art projects. I had just got off work and had roughly 90 minutes to kill. It was nice outside. Sunny and warm so I thought just taking a quick spin would be nice. By the time I was parked and ready to go, I had 45 minutes. I set my timer and set off. There was no particular goal.

n-grandI started west on Delmar and crossed Grand. Passing the old Palladium, I think about the Plantation Club that once was located here. It was a white only club that featured African-American jazz musicians and orchestras playing late into the night in the 1930s and 40s. Just to the north would have been Vandeventer Place but I imaging by that time it was well into it’s decline as the premier private street for the wealthiest of St. Louisans. Industry and city pollution was creeping in and ruining the idyllic setting. The Plantation Club’s entrance was on Enright, which bordered Vandeventer Place.

Speaking of Vandeventer Place, I was reading in the book, St. Louis Lost, that some of the mansion’s servants quarters were on Enright and there was at least one that had a tunnel that went from the servant’s home to the mansion. I guess it was to avoid the embarrassment of a neighbor having to see a servant on the grounds. The poor must be invisible. At the Plantation Club, the black people were just to entertain the whites in the shadow of decaying conspicuous consumption. I also read that many of the poor looked at Vandeventer Place with disdain and frankly could have gave a rats ass about saving it. Eventually it was all demolished by 1950 for the Veteran’s Administration Hospital that occupies the east end. The the west end of Vandeventer Place was demolished for a children’s detention home. It’s hard to imagine that space between Enright and Bell was once where the wealhiest of all St. Louisans lived. Now it is a place for the sick and other social institutions.

I meander up through streets just to the north – Windsor Place, Finney, Cook. I can see the remnants a middle class neighborhood but today it pock-marked with many vacant lots. Though there are some decent looking examples of Second Empire, Italianate, and Romanesque Revival houses – not many though.

I head west into what is the Vandeventer Neighborhood. I’ve rode through here on several occasions and there is an impressive amount of variety of houses that range from decent shape to rough and deteriorating. However, what is most noticeable is the amount of vacant lots. It’s a neighborhood that has been devastated by population loss and it’s a shame because it’s so close to Grand Center and St. Louis university. However, it’s a whole other world.

vande-housewebI ride west all the way to Pendelton. I ride west on Cook. I pass vacant blocks, then pass the crumbling Fout House that sits on the corner of Wittier and Cook. Other than that house the block isn’t that bad in terms of decay. There is a nice looking garden across the street, and well kept houses but still – the vacant lots are so numerous. I think at this point the vacant lots outnumber the houses. Still the people that live here seem to take pride in their homes.

I basically just zig-zag down to C D Banks, Bell, and Enright. It’s the same as Cook. Some great looking houses, some empty, and many many vacant lots. It’s a puzzle missing so many of it’s pieces, it’s hard to tell what it should be or what it was.

On the southern edge is the old Hodiamont Streetcar ROW. It ends just to the west of the old Vandeventer Place. I see the old streetcar line is a hint to the importance and wealth of this area. That line went through the most prosperous neighborhoods in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. It went through Lewis Place, Fountain Park, Visitation, Academy, the West End and then out into the county which was mainly rural but was dotted with wealthy estates. Rather than ride on the streets, it had it’s own right-of-way. It served the most privileged people in the city.

What is great about being on a bike becomes evident here. I rode for about 30-35 minutes and covered so much ground. I greatly appreciate efficiency and productivity. I saw so much in a short time and still had time to put my bike away and get to the lecture early. Now, if I could have done something about the sweat. It’s a bit embarrassing to run into people and I’m sweaty but maybe that’s who I am. I’m that girl on a bike.