hipointestonehouse

Storms on the Hi-Pointe

About a few days before my vacation out to Denver and Rocky Mountain National Park I was going to explore around Hi-Pointe and Franz Park neighborhoods on the extreme west end of St. Louis. Checking the weather before the ride I could see there was a line of storms coming our way but they seemed a good distance away – far enough away I could get a ride in. I did get a ride in but I did have to cut it short faster than I thought I would have to. Compared to other rides, this one was pretty short.

I started over at the Forest Park Pavilion and made my way down Wells Rd on the south edge of the St. Louis Zoo and connected on to the Tamm overpass and then on to Oakland (which has a bike lane). This area is basically called Dogtown. Dogtown is an area that is essentially Clayton-Tamm, Hi-Pointe, and Franz Park. What seems great about this area is that it is so close to Forest Park, Clayton/Washington University, I-64 but it is not as exclusive as places immediately north of Forest Park. The houses around Hi-Pointe are varied from century old houses built not only of brick but of wood frame, brick ornate apartment complexes, some houses that are rather plain suburban tract looking houses, shotgun houses, a few stone houses and pretty much any style from 1900 to now. Essentially there isn’t a style of houses that dominate this area. The one thing that unifies the houses are that most are at a modest scale.

A lot of people believe that Hi-Pointe is the highest part of the city but that is actually near Sublette and Arsenal in The Hill neighborhood. I’m sure many people may disagree with me. The difference is about 10 feet. It’s very close. With that said, I’m not sure why Hi-Pointe is called that. Maybe there was a belief it was the highest point? Maybe it took the name after the great movie theater that is nearby at Clayton and McCausland? I’m not sure. I will say this, as a person on a bike, it is a hilly neighborhood.

hipointestonehouseIt is also very much a residential neighborhood with just a smattering of businesses, mostly on Clayton Ave.

As I meandered the streets there were a couple stone houses I enjoyed but I only got a picture of one. One sat diagonally at Clayton Ave and Grandview Place. The other was about halfway down Grandview Place. I didn’t really see any other houses like these in the area. They don’t look like the rock houses of Carondelet either. I’m going to guess it was built in the early 201th century because a lot of this area was developed around the World’s Fair. Anything around Forest Park became very fashionable at that time.

As I pedaled, the sky became more overcast. I kept a good eye on the western sky. In the meantime I saw a huge pig in someone’s front yard. This thing probably weighted more than me and I’m no flyweight. I’m always caught off-guard when I see farm animals in the city but I’m not sure why. First chickens are pretty popular to keep these days but in the earlier days of the city farmers would run their cows and pigs to the slaughterhouses or to be bought or sold in the city so I’m sure it wasn’t an uncommon sight to see a pig in the city. I will say this though, it wasn’t an aggressive pig and, unlike many dogs, it didn’t chase me. Like any good pig, it was eating.

hipointegarageI passed through some alleys, and saw a house in mid demolition and a guy was riding around on a small dirt bike motorcycle. Then I thought I heard a rumble.

I still took to riding south into Franz Park. Honestly, the neighborhood isn’t that much different but it isn’t surrounded by heavily traffic areas or by a fantastic hugely popular park. From what I know, there was a lot of brick manufacturing around this area and there were clay mines to supply the materials for brick. Many immigrants from Ireland, Poland, Italy, and Germany came here to work. The mines closed around World War II. Even today along the southern edge along Manchester, the it takes on a more industrial feel. Most of the neighborhood seems to just merge into Hi-Pointe and there isn’t really a distinctive change. As most of Hi-Pointe, the area seems quiet and subdivision-like.

I didn’t even get to see the centerpiece of the neighborhood, which is Franz Park. I definitely heard thunder and the sky to the west was getting substantially darker. Via the Franz Park website, “Sophia D. Franz gave her 5.32 acres to the city for a park and playground in honor of her husband Ehrhardt D. Franz in 1915, (with the stipulation to be used for a playground for the children). Ehrhardt was a wholesale merchandiser. He came to thee United States in 1854, and after accumulating some wealth, moved his family to St. Louis in 1871. Their house sat on 6730 Mitchell on what is now a tennis court in the playground.” My guess is the neighborhood was named for the Franz family.

stormrollinginI couldn’t stay out riding and I didn’t want to have to seek shelter under some awning or something. So I basically rode as fast as I could back to Forest Park. As I crossed I-64 on Tamm, the clouds were dark and lighting could be seen and the thunder was getting louder. I continued on my way. I sped down the bike trail and back to the Forest Park Pavilion. The sky was dark. I packed up but….

I want to watch this storm come in. So I walked over to the Pavilion with my water and watched it come in as kids swam in the fountains. Yes, kids were swimming in the fountains up until it started raining even as lightning flashed across the sky. All the lightning didn’t stop the parents from grabbing their kids and seeking shelter. Sigh…who am I to judge, I suppose. The storm blew in and I stood in the pavilion and felt the cool air of the storm. I will note, my air conditioning in my house was broke at this time so the storm’s breeze felt very good.

Every bike ride is some sort of adventure. There’s always new sights and noteworthy experiences. It’s part of the reason why I like riding the bike – errr exploring on a bike. I don’t bike commute or race bikes for sport – I just ride for fun and exploring. I just love it as a way to see the world around me, to seek something new and unexpected, to connect myself to the outside world, and to be sufficient and rely on my instincts. I didn’t see everything I wanted to or ride as long as I wanted to but sometimes that’s not for me to decide. Nature will have her way.

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Memorial Day in the Park

I thought I had written something about this ride but I haven’t. This was about a month ago so I am going to remember as much as I can. I do know this: riding my bike on Memorial Day has become a bit of a tradition for me. It is one of the rare times I ride during mid-day.

What I decided on was to ride my bike around Forest Park and into the Wydown-Skinker neighborhood that occupies a sliver of land just west of the park. Normally I pack rather light on my bike trips but this time I took a book, a sketchbook and some pencils, some snacks, and a blanket in addition to my camera and water. I stuffed it all in a backpack and was off. My idea was to be a little relaxed and to take it easy.

3cranesI started off in the Central West End to get on West Pine and enter the park and then ride around on the trails. I haven’t mentioned yet that it was hot and my backpack proved to be a bit more heavy than I liked. As the day and ride wore on these would greatly take it’s toll. One great thing (out of many great things) about Forest Park is that it has a lot of bike trails. It has fine gravel and paved trails so you can have variety in terrain. The park also has great variety in sights which I’ll get into. One of the first things to catch my eye is the skyline of the hospital and the cranes perched up amongst the construction. I became fascinated with it and wanted some pictures. I got some pictures from an overpass that crosses Forest Park Parkway and then I crossed into a grass path in an area with some small ponds and wild grasses. I take some more pictures with the cranes and buildings reflecting into the ponds. It was serene but very hot with no shade. I got a glimpse of the mansard roof of the Cabanne House but I wanted a better and closer look. I did like how it was peeking out from the trees but I was too far for the picture I was imagining. I hopped back on my bike and pedaled through the grass looking for a spot but couldn’t find one. Oh well. I start to wonder where I’m going to end up because I have no idea where I’m going.

I then happened upon another trail that follows a stream. There is an area of rock outcroppings and a shore made of large flat rocks. It’s easy to mistake these as nature but this is landscape. These ponds, rock outcroppings and such are planned. The park was designed by Maximillian G. Kern, the park superintendent and landscape gardener. The lakes are all artificial and filled via piped in water from the River Des Peres, Cabanne Spring, and storm water runoff. For the World’s Fair, in order to control flooding, the river was buried. Anyway, it’s all picturesque. The dogs enjoy the ponds too – they had the right idea to jump in and take a short swim to cool off. I, again, stop for more pictures and just watch the many that were biking or walking past for a few minutes. I watch dogs cool off and hear someone in the distance singing loudly. I wish I remembered what he was singing. I wish I could have jumped in that pond.

cabanne-houseI then find the Cabanne House that sits on Union near Lindell on the northern edge of the park. The Cabanne House was designed by James H. McNamara in 1875 and was part of the original master plan of the park that would open in 1876. For many years the house was used as a residence for park superintendents and commissioners but today it seems to be a house that is rented out for weddings and private events. Why is it called the Cananne House? It is because on the same site the farmhouse of Jean Pierre Cabanne that was built in 1819. Cabanne was a major landholder and owned the land Forest Park and land north of Forest Park. On this land was a dairy farm. When you’re in Forest Park or when you’re passing the many private places, imagine that at one time there were cows roaming the land. By the 1870s or so the Cabanne’s started selling land off for the developers of Forest Park and for the developers of Forest Park Terrace (now just Lindell on the north edge of the park), Kingsbury Pl, Washington Terrace and so on.

casadesI bike on the path along Lindell and look at the mansions, though I doubt many go back to the formation of Forest Park Terrace. I pass the History Museum and head toward Skinker. I then turn back and head back into the park and find a good place to rest. On my right I see some cascading waterfalls with some standing around taking pictures. It seems like a nice place and it’s shaded. Plus there is a trail up along the side. One may think that this is a natural formation but, again, one may be fooled. This is called Flegel Falls. It was built in the 1930s with WPA federal funding. Many people just know it as the Cascades. It was named after the World’s Fair Cascades that ran down Art Hill during the fair. I sit here for a bit and watch people. I read, snack a little and do a quick sketch of the cascades.

I ride of the hill to the Art Museum and take a breath at the Saint Louis statue known as the Apotheosis of St. Louis. It represents Louis IX of France, the person St. Louis is named after. This is not the original version of the statue. The original was made of plaster that was sculpted by Charles Henry Niehaus for the 1904 Worlds Fair. After the World’s Fair the Exposition Company presented a bronze version of the sculpture to the City of St. Louis. It was unveiled in the location where it stands in 1909. Until the Gateway Arch was built, this statue was the symbol of the city. The sun is beating down hard. There is a couple with baby getting pictures done by a photographer. I turn and gaze down Art Hill toward the Grand Basin. There is a runner taking a rest on the hill. Down by the pool with fountain, white. I imagine the white buildings from the Worlds Fair that surrounded that pool. I think of that awesome picture of Victorian Era St. Louisians sledding down the hill in their suits and dresses. I wonder if they ever thought that it would become a tradition? We still do it today. Not today today because it’s St. Louis Summer swampy hot. No sledding, just sweating.

wydownskink-flatI then head over to Skinker and want to cross into the Wydown-Skinker neighborhood. Tall skyscraper condos overlook the park. Skinker is a busy road so it takes some waiting to cross. This neighborhood is very narrow. It’s only a half-block wide (E-W) but extends north to Washington University and south to Clayton Rd. Something I notice is that I can tell when I cross into Clayton or St. Louis by how the pavement looks. I ride west to De Mun which is in Clayton. Along De Mun are some small cafes, maybe a wine bar. Mostly where I biked where multi-family brick apartment complexes are packed tightly together on a grid. On the northern edge and southern edge are a variety of single family houses that I think of as being mansion sized and built in the 1920s or later. I’d describe many of the houses take on a Colonial Revival, Tudor, and Craftsman styles. The streets gently curve and are tree-line. It’s quiet.

By this time, I’m running out of water. I am far from my starting point. Parched. The backpack seems heavier. Maybe I shouldn’t have packed so much. The first thing that comes to mind is that I hope there are water fountains nearby. The second thing I wonder is, do they work. I don’t know how many times I’ve been to a park and seen a water fountain but only find out it doesn’t work. I finally come up to one and it doesn’t work. I pedal past the Zoo and as I cross under Hampton, I see another fountain. Bingo! After a few seconds water comes out. I gulp some and fill my bottle. I gulp some more. I don’t even care how it tastes. It tastes great if it is greatly needed. In the future, I may have to invest in another water bottle and holder.

jewel-gatesI eventually come upon the Jewel Box. I can’t even think of the last time I went here or been inside. Basically it ‘s a big greenhouse built in 1936 in an Art Deco style. It’s tall with a stair-stepped barrel vault. Outside are some gardens with pools and fountains. I felt this was a good time, since I have water, to find some shade and roll out the blanket and eat the rest of my snacks and maybe read and sketch. I do find some trees near the old gates of Vandeventer Place. They were originally on Grand between Enright and Bell. It was a Private Place designed by Julius Pitzman in 1870. Soon after the wealthiest of St. Louisians built grand mansions. It had strict restrictions and was exclusive. Despite the restrictions, they couldn’t control what happened outside the private street. When it was built, it was countryside. It was on the outskirts of the city. However by 1910 the city was encroaching, factories and other industrial types of endeavors were built. More people moved around the place. It was becoming more urban and more polluted. It wasn’t a serene, idyllic setting anymore. The strict restrictions and standards were hard to keep up, residents started moving out – moving west to newer and more fashionable neighborhoods and private streets. It was in steep decline. By 1950, it was gone. It was demolished of the Veteran’s Administration Hospital. The gates were saved and moved to Forest Park. Today I eat my lunch nearby.

I sit and snack, drink my water and cool down a little. Then these oblong acorn looking pods started falling around me. I found it really hard to relax. So I ate and drank my water. Eventually one of the pods plunked me in head. Ok, it’s time to move along. At this point, I think it’s just time to head back. The clouds are building and some are looking a bit dark. I need to make my way to West Pine. I take a trail that takes me into the woods. I go across some old bridges. This wasn’t very bike friendly because there were a series of stairs. I had to carry my bike up the stairs several times. I notice the sky darkening more. Sigh. It looks like some rain. I’m tired and unhappy about trudging up stairs carrying my bike. I finally get up to West Pine and Kingshighway and some huge drops of rain scatter across the pavement and all around me. Strangely they are not all hitting me. The drops are far and wide. It doesn’t last long. There’s no thunder or lightning. In some ways, I hoped maybe the rain could cool me off a bit. I was done. Now it’s time for a real meal and a long nap. I’m exhausted.

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Hills to Clear The Mind

Today my ride was more about clearing my head than seeing anything. I did hit a couple new neighborhoods and biked more through Forest Park. The morning was cool but it was damp, cloudy and dark. Not ideal but it could be worse. There was some rain that was actually more of a mist than anything.

I’m not saying I didn’t see anything interesting but I just wasn’t that focused on it as much. I didn’t take many pictures. I just thought and huffed and puffed a lot. This ride was mostly about forgetting about all the political nonsense going on right now that has sent my stress level to an unhealthy level. It’s the type of stress that causes me high anxiety and endless ruminating on things I can’t control. It sends me into a ranting and inconsolable angry mess. I don’t like feeling powerless and unable to see a meaningful future that is hopeful. I am always hopeful for a better future cause I typically see the present as a unmitigated disaster or just boring. I just don’t have a sunny disposition or have unrelenting positivity about the present so I hope for a better future where I learn to be happier. I’m not sure how to make that happen.

I’m not saying NOTHING makes me happy. Many things make me happy or bring joy but it’s always tempered by some underlying doom. So I hope to be happier but in my soul I know that it may never happen. It’s just how it is so maybe I should just own it and like it.

wfpav-postcardAnyway, I started at the World’s Fair Pavilion that actually wasn’t there during the pinnacle of St. Louis history that was the 1904 World’s Fair. The pavilion is rather nice and I look it with the thought that it would be a great place for a wedding. It’s on a terraced hill and features waterfalls and features. The pavilion it self has this southwestern look with curved clay tiles on the roof, arched columns. I bet people have weddings there all the time. The pavilion opened in 1910 as a gift from the Louisiana Purchase Exposition Committee. It was designed by Henry Wright, with George E. Kessler, a landscaper.

Looking more into Henry Wright I learn he did many things in St. Louis. He designed the private subdivisions Brentmoor Park, Brentmoor, and Forest Ridge in Clayton. They were platted in 1910, 1911, and 1913. He was also instrumental in creating the design for Hi-Pointe subdivision between 1917 and 1923. The area just south of the southwest corner of Forest Park. He also did work in other cities such as Pittsburgh, New York City, Washington DC and other places on the east coast.

Another things Henry Wright is known for is that he was a major proponent of the Garden City. It was method of urban planning that was conceived in 1898 by Sir Ebenezer Howard in the United Kingdom. The vision was utopian and intention was to create highly organized, self-contained communities surrounded by “greenbelts”. There would be designated areas of residences, industry, and agriculture. I haven’t looked into this too much but it sounds like the concept of suburbanization – there would be a central cities with little cities around it with highly organized and separate spaces for housing, industry, commercial development. I’ll call it “zoning”. I think the idea was to create healthier environments for people to attain a higher quality of life. This was in opposition of the old, dirty, polluted, unorganized cities where factories and businesses and people were all were mixed together.

So I climbed up the hill by the Art Museum, swept down curvy winding hills passing people on morning walks, jogs and walking their dogs. I weaved through the forest on bumpy paths of mostly potholed concrete and gravel. I eventually made my way around the Zoo and over to cross the highway at Tamm. I made pedaled past the Bob Cassily created Turtle Park without giving it much notice. I swung over on to Oakland and then into the Clayton-Tamm neighborhood. The scenery was mostly brick multifamily housing that is distinctly different to the architecture closer to downtown. My guess is most of this was built in the 1920s-1930s and some later. The neighborhood is also known as Dogtown and it a neighborhood known for it’s Irish heritage and you will see that in the numerous pubs, and places decorated in green, shamrocks and such. It is St. Patrick’s Day weekend so I’m sure that area will be buzzing with activity. Headed south and east the houses are pretty ordinary, modest and lots of shotgun houses. Go further you will head downhill to Manchester.

I then swung up on to Macklind where it’s mostly light industry with some offices. One place is called American Pulverizer – that sounds like could maybe be the title of a book or movie. It would have to be something violent and action packed. I don’t think that is what is there now but it is carved into stone so it’s there forever. I was attracted by the White Castle regional office building which looks just like one of their restaurants. It’s white with a crenelated tower and their logo. All I could think of were chicken ring sliders. I love those things. I think I like them more than the burgers. I decide to turn around and breeze down the hill through the mist and cross Manchester and go into The Hill.

10554231_560357424124032_2144883462_nFirst though I stop on the bridge before the big hill to go into The Hill. It crosses what I think is the River Des Peres. At this point I think it is just a big open sewer. It is mostly empty right now and the bed is covered in concrete. The river used to snake through Forest Park but it was heavily modified for the World’s Fair probably for sanitary reasons. I think I read something about it being swampy and was known for harboring cholera and other water borne diseases. Eventually the river was buried. That said what a person sees of the River Des Peres today doesn’t resemble a natural river. It just looks like a wide concrete channel that goes through the south side and forms the southern border of the city and county. It eventually empties into the Mississippi. It looked nearly empty today but if it rains a lot it will fill up and can cause some flooding like it did around this past New Years.

I then huff and puff slowly cranking up the hill. I will mention Dogtown and Forest Park isn’t entirely flat. There was a lot of hill climbing. The climbing is really what clears the head cause there the thinking is for survival. Its breathe, breathe, breathe. Go. Go. Go. Keep going. Don’t quit. You can do this. Almost there. This is all as your legs are burning and getting tighter. Once to the top it is such a great relief and i just coast a little to get my composure. I’m not thin and fit. I’m middle aged and a bit chunky so I’m sure it doesn’t look graceful.

The Hill is the center of all that is Italian in St. Louis. Honestly, when I got up the hill the the scent of food cooking was mouth watering. Whatever it was, I bet it was heavenly but I got other things to do. I really didn’t spend much time in the neighborhood. A lot of modest homes, some shotgun, some simple one-story ranches that looked mid-century, some “gingerbread” tudors. It’s a variety but not big mansions or the more opulent styles just north of Forest Park. North was more upperclass and south was more working class.

magic-chefI retraced my route down Macklind and then I wanted to check out the old Magic Chef building which is now a big U-Haul storage area. It doesn’t look like much with all the corrugated metal cladding but it is a significant piece of midcentury modern architecture. It was built in 1947 and it’s architect was Harris Armstrong. It was in the International Style and there are not many buildings in St. Louis like it. It had big curtain windows on the south and east side. The west side has this tall brick tower jutting out. One part is rectangular and the brick portion is angular like a knife cutting into the glass and metal structure.

What may be more significant is the fact that there is a hidden Isamu Noguchi designed ceiling that is still there but under a drop ceiling. I hear it may be uncovered someday. That would be awesome to see. The curtain windows may never be uncovered again. I think it was said the cladding probably damaged it and it’s all in bad shape.

Here a little article about it from St. Louis Public Radio. Click to read.

The rest of the ride is getting back on Oakland and riding by what used to the the Forest Park Highlands that I never got to see. It was an amusement park that was around from 1896 to 1963. You can see lots of pictures and learn more about the pace here. Today Forest Park Community College occupies the space. I also ride past where the old Arena was. I do remember that pace. I went there some as a child to see the Ice Capades and other kid friendly stuff. It was the Blues used to place. I won’t hash out too much on it since there is a lot of stuff about it on the web, I am sure.

Here’s a video of the implosion. It was quite the spectacle! Lots of booms! Watch on YouTube.

From there it was past new glass structures for mixed use development, a Mercedes-Benz dealer, the vacant land left from the old Forest Park Hospital. The Zoo is supposed to do something with it. From there it was returning back via the bike/running trail and dodging runners and returning to the madness of life.